2:58 am - Sat, Sep 20, 2014
32,719 notes

Amazing… if this is T sporting this…well this is sick.

(Source: cjwho, via 30casterlyrock)

7:19 pm - Fri, Sep 19, 2014
Apple’s Patriot-Act-detecting “warrant canary” dies
It’s been less than a day since the company published its new, excellent privacy policy — but Gigaom has noticed that the latest Apple transparency report, covering Jan 1-Jun 30 2014, has eliminated the line that says that the company has received no secret Patriot Act “section 215” requests, which come with gag orders prohibiting companies from discussing them.
Apple is one of several companies whose transparency reports contain these warrant canaries — Apple’s dates from November 2013. They became more widely used after the revelations of mass surveillance brought to light by Edward Snowden.
The premise of a warrant canary is that Section 215 of the Patriot Act can compel companies not to tell anyone about being served with a warrant, but that the law can’t compel a company to lie and say that it hasn’t received a warrant. This has not been tested in court yet.
It seems likely, based on the latest report, that Apple has now received at least one of the secret surveillance requests.
The warrant canary’s disappearance is significant because Section 215 of the Patriot Act permits the National Security Agency to demand companies to hand over their business records in secret, and is believed to be the legal foundation of the controversial PRISM program, which forced major tech companies like Google and Yahoo to participate in a data-collection scheme.
The Patriot Act tool is also controversial because the NSA gains permission to use it by applying to the FISA Court, a body where only the government can speak and whose records are kept almost entirely secret. The tech industry has been battling to disclose the existence of so-called “FISA requests” and only won the right to do so this year; however, companies must wait six months to disclose the number of requests they receive, and can only do so as a range (such as “0-999″).
Apple’s “warrant canary” disappears, suggesting new Patriot Act demands.
_____
Cloak & Dagger….what else is new? Limbo… - BDA

Apple’s Patriot-Act-detecting “warrant canary” dies

It’s been less than a day since the company published its new, excellent privacy policy — but Gigaom has noticed that the latest Apple transparency report, covering Jan 1-Jun 30 2014, has eliminated the line that says that the company has received no secret Patriot Act “section 215” requests, which come with gag orders prohibiting companies from discussing them.

Apple is one of several companies whose transparency reports contain these warrant canaries — Apple’s dates from November 2013. They became more widely used after the revelations of mass surveillance brought to light by Edward Snowden.

The premise of a warrant canary is that Section 215 of the Patriot Act can compel companies not to tell anyone about being served with a warrant, but that the law can’t compel a company to lie and say that it hasn’t received a warrant. This has not been tested in court yet.

It seems likely, based on the latest report, that Apple has now received at least one of the secret surveillance requests.

The warrant canary’s disappearance is significant because Section 215 of the Patriot Act permits the National Security Agency to demand companies to hand over their business records in secret, and is believed to be the legal foundation of the controversial PRISM program, which forced major tech companies like Google and Yahoo to participate in a data-collection scheme.

The Patriot Act tool is also controversial because the NSA gains permission to use it by applying to the FISA Court, a body where only the government can speak and whose records are kept almost entirely secret. The tech industry has been battling to disclose the existence of so-called “FISA requests” and only won the right to do so this year; however, companies must wait six months to disclose the number of requests they receive, and can only do so as a range (such as “0-999″).

Apple’s “warrant canary” disappears, suggesting new Patriot Act demands.

_____

Cloak & Dagger….what else is new? Limbo… - BDA

(Source: Boing Boing)

6:15 pm
When I realized I didn’t have to, I became a bitch on wheels.

Sylvia Sidney 

Ummmmm toughest woman alive, I mean the very first Jodie Foster. - BDA

4:44 pm
1 note

Anti Internet-Censorship Group Selling Vladimir Putin And Kim Jong-un Cat Scratching Posts

These are the Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong-un cat scratching posts sold by The Pussycat Riot, an advocacy group of cats against cyber censorship created by the folks at HideMyAss.com, which provides virtual private network services for online anonymity. And as cool as either one would be to have, they cost £4,500 (~$7,400) apiece, making it far cheaper to print out a picture of Putin or Jong-un’s face from the internet and tape it to an existing cat post. Thankfully, they also sell £3 (~$5) litter boxes with the faces of various internet censorship friendly world leaders printed on the bottom so your cats can shit all over them.

(Source: geekologie.com)

4:29 pm

The Online Legacy of a Suicide Cult and the Webmasters Who Stayed Behind

Ashley Feinberg

Every month, the bills get paid on time. The emails get answered, and any orders filled. Which, for HeavensGate.com, is positively extraordinary. Because as far as the public is aware, every last member of the suicide cult died 17 years ago from a cocktail of arsenic and apple sauce. A few stayed behind, though. Someone had to keep the homepage going.

Today, at first glance, the fully functional, 17-year-old website seems like just one more of the many GeoCities-era relics that litter the internet. Visitor counts, flashing text, Word Art gradients; the whole gang’s here and then some. Dig a little deeper, though, and you’ll find that almost every link adds yet another layer to a wildly extensive dogma, totally earnest in its interweaving of disembodied space aliens, Jesus, secret UFOs, prophets to whom aliens speak, comets coming to save us, and the suicide it takes to get there.

It’s not just text (though there is plenty of that); Heaven’s Gate’s internet remains also include hours upon hours of video recorded some time between 1993 and 97, the year the majority of the group committed suicide in anticipation of sublimating to the spacecraft that trailed comet Hale-Bopp.

Those recorded statements from “students” before their deaths (as well as their leaders’ own testimony) exist not only as videos on the site, but as transcripts. These were intended to last. And they have, thanks to the guardians of HeavensGate.com.

Today, only a few Heaven’s Gate believers remain. Two of them sit on the other end of the website’s sole contact email address, and will promptly respond to your inquiries. Which seems odd for a group whose members are all widely believed to be dead.

The people who respond to HeavensGate.com queries refer to themselves simply as “Telah” and “we.” They’ll answer questions if you ask—that’s part of the gig—but they’ve wearied of the rubberneckers that have passed through ever since their fellow active members committed suicide in 1997. Which is perhaps to be expected when you’re the only official contact point for one of the largest, most bizarre mass suicides in human history.

In fact, what’s most surprising about the Heaven’s Gate website is that for all the hundreds of pages of sermons and prophecies and transcripts held within the site and its advertised wares, the bizarre, often incoherent text really doesn’t tell you all that much.

And what it does tell you isn’t half as interesting as the people who are doling it out.

(continued here)

4:14 pm
8,632 notes

herochan:

Batman Through Mexican Creativity

Created by Kimbal

(via:vyntic)

Holy shit this is amazing….

3:38 am
2 notes

Clever Ad Campaign Invites Viewers To Explore Everyday Science

Advertising campaigns are meant to get attention, to engage the viewer in a way that sparks their interest in the product or service being offered. 

Restaurants want to make you hungry, service providers want to prove they have the lowest price, but how does a science museum go about advertising to the public?

They engage the public by showing them the science of the everyday, making concepts more easily understood and inviting the viewer to explore the wonders of the scientific world at their museum.

Science World at TELUS World of Science in Vancouver, British Columbia wanted to create a series of unique and very original ads for their museum, so in 2010 they commissioned creative agency Rethink Canada to help bring their visions to life.

What began as a simple set of radio commercials has turned into a multimedia, multiplatform campaign that has people talking, and touching, and interacting with their ads. 

(Source: neatorama.com)

1:08 am
886 notes

2headedsnake:

Jose Romussi

1:04 am
4,175 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother

"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different storyparticularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 

Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 

In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 

The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  

3:54 pm - Thu, Sep 18, 2014
222 notes

hifructosemag:

This Saturday, CHG Circa will debut “Giants Among Us,” a group show that challenged artists to interpret the figure of the giant and how it plays out in folklore, contemporary culture and their own mythology. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

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